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I’m an Agilist, a former software engineer, a gamer, an improviser, a podcaster emeritus, and a wine lover. Learn more.

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Entries in things i've watched (1)

Friday
Sep302011

Lessons from the Workroom

So I’ve mentioned that I’ve started watching Project Runway. Something happened on the episode that aired last night that really resonated with me. Here’s Carolyn Kellogg’s writeup that captures the relevant details:

Hot on the heels of creating hippie-ish outfits for a band, this week comes another challenge that sends the exasperated contestants straight back to the ’70s: They must create an outfit inspired by the “sophisticated ’70s” for sponsor Piperlime.com. The twist: At the last minute they’ll have to also create a second accompanying garment.

Contestants who’ve watched the show — all of them — are ready for this kind of “twist.” They’re also ready to create something for the mass market using a limited amount of dollars: $100 for the first outfit, $50 for the second. What they’re not used to is dropping that $100 somewhere in Mood, and not getting it back.

That’s Anya. She stands in Mood crying. This has never happened before, a contestant losing Mood money. Her mascara smears.

Tim Gunn tells her she can make her outfit with the muslin from the workroom and she can ask the other contestants for help. Only Anthony Ryan has yet to be rung up, and he gives her his change: $11.50. That’s all she can spend.

OK, maybe it wasn’t such a good idea for Anya to carry her envelope of money tucked into her dress above her breast, but it was the most interesting thing to happen all episode. The season is shaping up to be just plain dull, so Anya’s freak-out provided much-needed drama. Yet an Anya freak-out doesn’t last long: She cries, she worries, and then she gets to work.

I’d already decided that Anya is my favorite person on the show. She’s definitely got design chops. It’s obvious she has a great eye for composition and geometry, her use of prints is great, and she tends to make choice that push the envelope yet don’t make you wonder what planet she’s from. She’s a solid competitor, even if I think she won’t win the whole thing. But it’s her approach to the endeavor that’s really won me over. She seems able to honestly appraise her own work, something that some of the other people on the show don’t seem able to do at all. She’s one of the few people on the show who is willing to admit — in front of the judges — when she’s made mistakes. She doesn’t get involved in the drama that invariably breaks out between the contestants. And when things go wrong, as they did in a huge way this week, she knuckles down and does the work.

That’s the way I want other people to describe me.




Update

Fitness: Rest day
Sun, Moon, and Stars: 380 words, 347 seven-day average, 287 average, 52721 total, 279 to go for the week; 6-day streak