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I’m an Agilist, a former software engineer, a gamer, an improviser, a podcaster emeritus, and a wine lover. Learn more.

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Wednesday
Aug172011

Wine Varietals: Overview

Great Wine Made Simple talks about the Big Six, the six biggest selling varietals in the US. Far be it for me to disagree with a Master Sommelier, and I do think these are an excellent starting point. I like to expand this list to nine, however, given how common several other prominent varietals are on wine lists I’ve seen the last ten years. So here’s my list of essential varietals to learn:

White

Red

Each of these has a distinct profile. All but one are widely grown in several areas around the world. So I bet you can guess what I’m going to be talking about for the next nine weeks. But first a poll: How many of these nine have you had? How many do you feel you understand well?




Update

Fitness: Ran 2.5 miles
Sun, Moon, and Stars: 484 words, 441 seven-day average, 266 average, 37175 total, 825 go for the week; 7-day streak

Reader Comments (3)

Speaking as an Australian who lives not far from 5 major wine growing regions (Barossa Valley, Clare Valley, McLaren Vale, Coonawarra, Fleurieu Peninsula) and not a few minor ones I have at least heard of and drunk wines that match the first 6 on your list but have not heard of Syra, Sangiovese and Zinfandel. On the other hand we see quite a bit of Shiraz here and I don't see that on your list.

August 18, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterPeter Kelley

Syrah and Shiraz are actually the same grape. (But Petite Sirah is something different.)

Sangiovese is the major Italian red grape, but it's grown in a lot of other regions too. Zinfandel is the outlier; it's grown almost exclusively in California.

August 18, 2011 | Registered CommenterPaul

America's Test Kitchen is apparently coming out with a Cooking With Wine magazine. I don't really drink wine, so it's of little interest to me, but you might want to check it out.

August 19, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterWayne

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